JUS BLAZE Untitled Document
www.officialjusblaze.com
humansofnewyork:

His owner told me that according to a Native American myth, dogs with different colored eyes can see both heaven and earth.
psilolysergicamine:

fuck
eyeburfi:

Rishimandala pata.  Images of  24 Tirthankaras are superimposed on the sacred syllable - Hrim.
via inlinethumb63.webshots.com
eyeburfi:

A Jain Painting on Cloth. India, Gujarat, 19th Century. The 24 Tirthankaras (depicted along with their cognizances) form the tantric meditative syllable HRIM. Via www.columbia.edu
eyeburfi2:

Snakes and Ladders (gyan chaupar) Board of “large Pahari type” (with 342 squares). At the top are depictions of three deities: Siva, Visnu and Brahma.
Source: British Museum
eyeburfi2:

A 20th century pilgrimage map of Varanasi, based on this older woodblock print. Source: Spatial Texts, Religious Cartography and Pilgrimage Practice | Hypotheses.org
eyeburfi2:

Ravana shaking Mount Kailash, c 1790-1800, Mandi. Source: National Museum.
 
 
eyeburfi2:

A Domestic Scene of Shiva and Parvati with Family India, Himachal Pradesh, Guler or Mandi, attributed to Sajnu, circa 1810-20.
This painting by the Pahari painter Sajnu depicts Shiva and Parvati straining bhang for drinking. Scenes of the Holy Family in domestic bliss were a popular theme with Pahari painters. In these scenes, Shiva is transformed and humanized from the wild ascetic to a doting husband and father, though still retaining trappings of his divine status. 
Source: Indian Routes 
eyeburfi2:

Shiva, Parvati and Family, Guler, c 1780. The holy family in a domestic scene, darning cloth and stringing a garland of skulls
eyeburfi2:

The Holy Family. c 1780-1800  Pahari, Kangra or Garhwal. Source: Art Gallery NSW
Shiva swaying to the music played by his wife Parvati, and his elephant-headed son, Ganesha.  Shiva’s multi-headed son, Kartikeya, his bull mount, Nandi, Ganesha’s rat mount and Kartikeya’s peacock mount are also seen.
philamuseum:

That’s one bloody battle! 11 elephants get caught in the crossfire in an epic battle between Simurgh, the fabulously colorfed bird and Gaja-Simha, the elephant-lion. Who do you think wins? See more spectacular imagery in the recently installed show, “The Peacock and the Cobra: James Prosek among the Arts of South Asia.” “Simurgh Attacking a Gaja-Simha Carrying Elephants,” early 19th century, artist unknown
martinmart:

chakras
martinmart:

Kalachakra Cosmology
organicbody:

Radha and Krishna
(via: oldindianarts.in, source: indianminiaturepaintings.co.uk)